Haunts & Headstones

Haunts & Headstones

Explore Franklin's storied past with the Haunts & Headstones walking tour! This self-guided tour takes you by some of Franklin's haunted homes and historic cemeteries dating back to the when the city was founded. When you're finished, head to the downtown Franklin visitor center to pick up your Haunts & Headstones button!

Distance: 0.97 miles
Difficulty: Easy

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Haunts & Headstones

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Haunts To Explore

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Gaut House
This home was built in 1829 by Thomas Maney. During the Civil War, this was the home of Sallie Ewing Carter, called by a Union soldier “one of the famous beauties in Middle Tennessee.” Sallie, widowed twice with five children, was a staunch Confederate, flying the first Confederate flag in town...
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What's Included

  • Stop 1: Gaut House
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The Knight House
The Knight House is named for Josiah Knight who bought the lot for this house in 1812. Arched French windows, arched side panels and a fanlight over the front door distinguished the handsome residence. Early deeds describe this lot as being beside the lot on which the jail formerly stood. A former...
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What's Included

  • Stop 2: The Knight House
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The Handy Residence
This elegant Federal two-story brick residence is one of Franklin's most distinguished architectural landmarks. Now a law office, it was once the home of T.K. Handy, who lived there for a great many years, as did some of his descendants. Former residents reported that the ghostly female spirit of...
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What's Included

  • Stop 3: The Handy Residence
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Perkins Howarth House
This Tennessee vernacular style with a Greek Revival porch was built in the 1820s. During the Battle of Franklin, its basement sheltered many Franklin residents. At one time, classes of Tennessee Female College were held here until that college burned in 1886. The house also served as a nursing...
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What's Included

  • Stop 4: Perkins Howarth House
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Vaughan House
In 1896, Judge Josiah Carr Eggleston and his wife Julia Plummer Eggleston bought this house, built in the late 1880s. In the 1930s, the house and the Egglestons themselves provided the inspiration for a series of children's stories called "Those Plummer Children," written by Christine Noble Govan.

What's Included

  • Stop 5: Vaughan House
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Walker-Ridley House
Andrew Johnston, a prosperous early Franklin businessman, built this house as one of three Johnston houses in a row on Bridge Street. Nashville business tycoon Rogers Caldwell moved to the house in 1957. Caldwell, once called the “J.P. Morgan of the South,” built an empire during the 1910s-20s,...
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What's Included

  • Stop 6: Walker-Ridley House
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Old City Cemetery
In Old City Cemetery repose the remains of the town’s earliest settlers. Among the early settlers buried here are Ewen Cameron, who built Franklin’s first house, Dr. Daniel McPhail, who died in the Mexican War, and Fountain Branch Carter, whose house is now a Civil War museum. The rear portion...
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What's Included

  • Stop 7: Old City Cemetery
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Rest Haven Cemetery & The Unknown Soldier
This cemetery contains the bodies of many who lived through the fiery trial of civil war and occupation, including the grave of the unknown soldier. On October 10, 2009, an unknown soldier’s remains (which were discovered during a construction project on Columbia Avenue) were reinterred in Rest...
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What's Included

  • Stop 8: Rest Haven Cemetery & The Unknown Soldier
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The Kinnard House
This charming house is one of Franklin's earliest dwellings, dating back to 1810 or before. It was built by Gideon Blackburn, founder of the First Presbyterian Church in Franklin, and an important figure in Presbyterian history of the area. The clapboards cover hand-hewn logs, a testament to the early age of the house.

What's Included

  • Stop 9: The Kinnard House
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Walker-Fisher House
The present owners are the fifth generation of the Fisher family to own the house. The third Johnston house, which was a block away at the corner of Hillsboro Road, was torn down in 1969 to make way for a gas station. It was the destruction of that house that led to the formation of the Heritage...
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What's Included

  • Stop 10: Walker-Fisher House
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Bridge House
The original ownership of this house is not known for certain, but Richard Andrews bought the property in 1834 from Benjamin Tappan. Lydia Heath, who lived here until her death in 1919, bought it in 1858. Never a large house, it has always been noted for its beautiful woodwork and graceful design....
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What's Included

  • Stop 11: Bridge House
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Bennett House
This house was built in the 1870s by Walter James Bennett. The Bennett name was well known in business circles on Main Street for over 100 years, and many county residents remember Bennett's Hardware Store at the corner of 4th and Main. The house remained in the Bennett family until 1967 when its...
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What's Included

  • Stop 12: Bennett House
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Fourth Ave Church Of Christ
The Fourth Avenue Church of Christ, located here, grew out of a meeting conducted in Franklin in 1833. For several years, the congregation met in members’ homes as well as the Masonic Lodge, finally constructing their first building in 1851 at this location. The church was restored in 1855,...
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What's Included

  • Stop 13: Fourth Ave Church Of Christ
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Franklin Visitor Center
The final Haunts & Headstones stop is the downtown Franklin visitor center. Stop in to pick up your Haunts & Headstones button and to ask about the ghostly presence of a young boy named Felix!

What's Included

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